Bar Operations & Admissions

We're here to serve.

The Bar provides lawyers access to a variety of services within the legal community. We help you connect with clients, provide tools to build your practice, and oversee compliance and admissions to the Utah State Bar. The Bar also coordinates the services of Utah Law and Justice Center. We’re here to answer any questions you may have. 

The application process

Bar admissions & applications.

Meeting & Event Services

Utah Law & Justice Center.

The Utah Law and Justice Center was built not only as a place to house the Utah State Bar but also to provide a gathering place for the community in such a way as to organize and nurture law-related educational, charitable, and community services. It’s here for you.

Navigate the requirements

Compliance assistance.


Find resources like licensing information, CLE and MCLE information that you need to make regulatory processes easier and to help ensure you are in compliance with court rules and requirements.

Find a community near you

Section & Affinity Group resources.

Learn about Bar sections and regional/specialty Bars and find how you can improve your professional network.


Participate in the Bar through service

Election information.

Stay informed. Get involved. Read up on upcoming elections, find out who is serving in Bar leadership, and learn how you can run for office.


Regulatory Information

Governing articles.

Summary of Utah Lawyer Licensing, reinstatement, resignation & readmission

Policies and processes.

Below are the policies and procedures that govern the day to day operation of the Utah State Bar.

If you cannot find a given policy, or have questions, please use the contact form at the bottom of each web page.

1. Active. A lawyer who is engaged in the practice of law must be licensed on Active Status. The practice of law is the “representation of the interests of another person by informing, counseling, advising, assisting, advocating for or drafting documents for that person through application of the law and associated legal principles to that person’s facts and circumstances.” You must pay the current active licensing fee plus the required annual Client Security Fund assessment (up to $20.00) and you must satisfy continuing legal education requirements. The current annual fee is $425. Rule 14-802(b)(1) (Authorization to Practice Law); Rule 14-101 et seq. (RIM); Rule 14-203 (Bylaws).

2. Active, Under Three. A lawyer on Active Status who has taken the Student Bar Examination and has not been admitted to practice for more than three years in any jurisdiction qualifies for a reduced fee. Lawyers who took the Attorney Bar Examination do not qualify. Lawyers on Active Under Three status must pay the appropriate licensing fee ($250.00) plus the required Client Security Fund assessment (up to $20.00) and satisfy, when applicable, New Lawyer Training Program requirements. Rule 14-101 et seq. (RIM); Rule 14-203 (Bylaws); 14-401 et sq. (MCLE).

3. Active Emeritus. A lawyer who has been a member of the Bar for 50 years or is 75 years old as of July 1 of the current year qualifies for Emeritus Status and is not required to pay a licensing fee or the Client Security Fund assessment. If you are practicing law while on Emeritus Status, you are considered Active Emeritus and must meet continuing legal education requirements. Rule 14-101 et seq. (RIM); Rule 14-203 (Bylaws); Rule 14-401 et seq. (MCLE).

4. Inactive. A lawyer on Inactive Status may be considered to be in good standing but may not practice law in the state of Utah and is not required to meet continuing legal education requirements. The annual fee is $105 (inactive no service). If you want to receive the Utah Bar Journal and Casemaker, the fee is $150 (inactive full service). To be placed on Inactive Status, please indicate by paying the inactive fee when renewing through the annual licensing form or by letter (Request to go on Inactive Status .DOC). You will not automatically receive Inactive Status by not paying the annual licensing fee. If you do not pay the licensing fee, you will be administratively suspended for failure to renew. Rule 14-101 et seq. (RIM); Rule 14-203 (Bylaws).

5. Inactive Emeritus. A lawyer who has been a member of the Bar for 50 years or is 75 years old as of July 1 of the current year and who wishes to be on Inactive Status is not required to pay a licensing fee, the Client Security Fund assessment or meet continuing legal education requirements. Rule 14-101 et seq. (RIM); Rule 14-203 (Bylaws).

1. House Counsel – Current Status. A lawyer who qualifies and is admitted and licensed as a House Counsel shall limit his or her practice including legal representation only to the business of his or her employers. House Counsel are not permitted to practice law generally by appearing in court or offering legal services or advice to the public. A House Counsel may be considered in Good Standing. In order to remain on current status, you must pay the current Active Status fee (but no fees for the Client Security Fund). The current annual fee is $425. You also must satisfy your primary licensing jurisdiction’s continuing legal education requirements. Utah Rule of Admission 14-720.

2. Inactive Lawyers Providing Legal Services for Legal Services Organizations. A lawyer who qualifies for this status may practice law only in accordance with Supreme Court approved Rule 14-803. See licensing category “#4 Inactive”, above for licensing requirements.

3. Military Lawyers. A military lawyer licensed in another jurisdiction and in good standing may qualify to practice law before the Utah courts upon application and approval under Supreme Court approved Rule 14-804. You must pay a $10 processing fee and your limited license shall be terminated when you end active duty military service in Utah or when you no longer meet the requirements to practice under the applicable rule.

4. Foreign Legal Consultants. A person who is a member in good standing of a recognized legal profession in a foreign country who qualifies to obtain a limited license as a Foreign Legal Consultant, may be admitted upon fulfilling all requirements set forth in Supreme Court Approval Rule 14-805. Foreign Legal Consultants may only practice law in accordance with Rule 14-805. Such persons shall be subject to an annual renewal of their license along with payment of current approved fees for Active Status members of the Bar.

Lawyers should be aware of the process of reinstating their Bar license after suspension, the availability of resignation from the Bar, and the process of readmission to the Bar after resignation. The following information does not apply to limited licenses which have separate provisions.

Reinstatement after Suspension for Failure to Renew. A lawyer whose license has been suspended for failing to pay any required fees may be reinstated by paying the licensing fees at the Inactive Status for each of the years suspended plus the current licensing fee, the current Client Security Fund assessment and a $200 reinstatement fee. RLDD 14-508; past inactive fees charged by policy.

Resignation from the Bar. If there are no disciplinary matters outstanding or pending and he or she is not currently suspended from the practice of law, a lawyer may resign from the Bar by submitting a written notification of resignation. If there are disciplinary matters outstanding or pending or he or she is currently suspended from the practice of law, a lawyer may submit a written notification of resignation, which will not be effective unless approved by the Office of Professional Conduct. Section B.1(g)(1), Bar’s Policies and Procedures.

Readmission to the Bar after Resignation without Discipline Pending.A lawyer who resigned without discipline pending prior to September 15, 2003 and who wishes to be readmitted must file a verified petition for readmission, addressed to the Bar Commission and filed with the Executive Director, identifying the lawyer’s name, age, past and current residences and business address, all occupations during the period subsequent to resignation and the reason for resignation. The lawyer must also pay a $200 filing fee. A lawyer who resigned without discipline pending after September 15, 2003 and who wishes to be readmitted must file an Application for Admission to the Utah State Bar and be approved by the Character and Fitness Committee, pay a $1000 filing fee and comply with all other requirements for admission. This process may take several months. Rule 14-717(a), Rules Governing Admission; fees established by policy.

Regardless of when the lawyer resigned, he or she must pay the Bar licensing fee, court enrollment fees, and retake the required oaths. Readmission is limited to three opportunities a year; October, February, and May. Rule 14-716.

Readmission after Resignation with Discipline or Discipline Pending.Please contact the Bar’s Office of Professional Conduct and Office of Admissions.

Cancellation notice must be provided to the CLE department at least 48 hours prior to the event date. If cancellation is made within the time period, the registration fee, minus a predetermined fee, will be returned to the registrant. No refunds will be given for cancellations made after that time.

The full registration fee is due and payable to the Utah State Bar if a cancellation is not received prior to the event as described above and the registrant does not attend or sends a substitute.

This policy does not apply to the Spring and Annual Conventions or other seminars where a separate cancellation policy is expressly written to govern the event attendance.

Please send cancellations via email to cle@utahbar.org

Utah State Bar Statement on Diversity and Inclusion
December 2, 2011

The Bar values engaging all persons fully, including persons of different ages, disabilities, economic status, ethnicities, genders, geographic regions, national origins, sexual orientations, practice settings and areas, and races and religions. Inclusion is critical to the success of the Bar, the legal profession, and the judicial system.

The Bar shall strive to:

1. Increase members’ awareness of implicit and explicit biases and their impact on people, the workplace, and the profession;

2. Make Bar services and activities open, available, and accessible to all members;

3. Support the efforts of all members in reaching their highest professional potential;

4. Reach out to all members to welcome them to Bar activities, committees, and sections; and

5. Promote a culture that values all members of the legal profession and the judicial system.

Bar Commissioners, Bar staff and any member of the Bar may anonymously report concerns regarding fraud, violations of law, conflicts of interest, other breakdown in internal controls, financial reporting issues, and other areas of major governance concern to the Chief Justice of the Utah Supreme Court for investigation and action as is deemed by the Chief Justice to be appropriate.

The Utah State Bar may not discharge any employee or otherwise discriminate against any employee with respect to the employee’s compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment because the employee or any person acting pursuant to a request of the employee has reported concerns about operations, management or governance issues of the Bar; testified or is about to testify in any investigation or proceeding dealing with such concerns; or assisted or participated or is about to assist or participate in any manner in such investigation or proceeding.

Thank you for visiting the web site of the Utah State Bar and reviewing our privacy policy and the other notices on this page. The privacy policy discloses the type of information collected on this web site, why it is gathered and how it is used. The other notices provide additional information about the content, copyright, and use of this site

Disclaimers

The Utah State Bar attempts to maintain the accuracy of the content of its web site. Any errors or omissions should be reported to webmaster@utahbar.org

The Utah State Bar makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the absolute accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the contents of this web site and expressly disclaims liability for errors and omissions in the contents. No warranty of any kind, implied or expressed, or statutory, including but not limited to the warranties of non-infringement of third party rights, title, merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and freedom from computer virus, is given with respect to the contents of this web site or its hyperlinks to other Internet resources. Reference in this web site to any specific commercial products, processes, or services, or the use of any trade, firm, or corporation name is for the information and convenience of the Utah State Bar members and the public, and does not constitute endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the Utah State Bar, or its employees or agents.

Legal Information is Not Legal Advice

This site includes areas that will provide information that is intended to help the public find legal assistance, learn about the law and legal system in Utah, or work more effectively with an attorney. This site and any information provided, however, does not constitute legal advice and must not be used as a substitute for the counsel and services that may be required from an attorney. The Utah State Bar is not responsible for the consequences of the application of any information taken from this web site.

agency that may be better able to assist you. Email information is not used to create personal profiles nor will it be forwarded on to others for commercial use. E-mail containing threatening or abusive language or containing language that describes or promotes unlawful activity, will be sent on to the appropriate law enforcement agencies.

The Utah State Bar sends email to its members to assist with licensing, compliance support and to provide information about the operation of the Bar. Email from the Utah State Bar to its members is not covered by the Can-Spam Act because it falls under the transactional and relationship exceptions to the Act.

Members who do not wish to receive email from the Utah State Bar have the option of creating a filter, blocking the domain with its attendant risks or deleting emails as they come in. However, those members who take action to block or filter email from the Bar risk missing notifications and reminders about licensing and compliance deadlines. Members who miss these deadlines risk administrative suspension.

Website Linking Policy

The Utah State Bar web site contains links to other sites on the Internet. When these links are followed you may be exiting the Utah State Bar’s web site and entering another site. When this happens, you are obviously no longer on the Utah State Bar’s web site and are subject to the privacy policies and conditions of the new site. The Utah State Bar is not responsible for the practices or content of these or any other sites.
Privacy

The Utah State Bar does not collect personal information about you unless you choose to provide that information to us or you choose to use a service on this web site where gathering personal information is necessary in order to deliver the service. The information submitted is used only to provide the requested services and will not be sent on to third parties. Use of these services is voluntary; if you do not wish personal information to be collected avoid using these aforementioned services.

If you do nothing during your visit to our web site but browse or download information, our web server automatically logs and stores certain information. Personal identifying information and email are not collected as part of the web server’s logging process

The information that is automatically collected and stored is:

Your Internet domain and IP address.

The type of browser and operating system you used to access this site.

The date and time of your visit to this site.

The web pages or services you accessed at this site.

The IP address of the web site from which you came to this site.

The web site to which you go when you leave this site.

If you downloaded a form, the form that was downloaded.

This information is used to:

Diagnose potential problems with the server.

Evaluate and improve the content and make this site more useful to our visitors.

Gather statistical data on the number of visitors to this site, navigation patterns, and the types of technology they use.

The Utah State Bar makes every attempt to avoid the use of “cookies,” the text files stored on your computer by your web browser. Cookies may be used on this site when needed to maintain the functionality of an interactive application and is used only during the session in which you access the interactive application.

Cookie files created on your computer by using this web site do not contain personal information and do not compromise your privacy or security. The cookie feature is used only to store a randomly generated identifying temporary tag on your computer. You can refuse the cookie or delete the cookie file from your computer by using any of the widely available methods. However, if you turn off your cookie option, you may not be able to access some of the features in our interactive applications.

E-mail Communication & Privacy

Personal information that is sent via email will only be used to respond to your message and for no other purposes. Occasionally we may forward the information that you have provided to a different

Linking to the Utah State Bar’s web site is permitted under limited conditions. If you link to the Utah Bar’s web site, you may not portray any person, event or subject in a false or misleading light. Persons wishing to link to the Utah Bar’s web site shall not create a link that contains a frame. All links to any web page in the Utah State Bar web site network shall only be through a separate browser window, with the URL address of the Utah State Bar clearly visible in the address. This limited conditional link use does not authorize the use of any trademarks belonging to the Utah State Bar. There is NO authorization to use, copy or distribute any of Utah State Bar trademarks or Utah State Bar web site content without separate and express written authority from the Utah State Bar. You may not imply that the Utah State Bar is endorsing any product or services.

Ownership, copyright and trademark notice

Copyright © The Utah State Bar, 1939-2013

This web site, web pages and all publications in the site are copyrighted by the Utah State Bar. Except as to licensing information about attorneys that is in the public domain, all right, title, and interest to the content displayed on the web site, including but not limited to the web site’s look and feel, data, information, text, graphics, images, sound or video materials, designs, trademarks, service marks, trade names, and URL is the property of the Utah State Bar, or its respective partners, agents or third parties. You may not use or display any trademarks or service marks owned by the Utah State Bar without our prior written consent. Visitors to the Utah State Bar’s web site are granted permission to reprint materials at the site for personal, non-commercial use. All other rights are reserved by the Utah State Bar.

Notice of Legislative Rebate

Bar policies provide that lawyers may receive a rebate of the proportion of their annual Bar license fee which has been expended during the fiscal year for lobbying and any legislative-related expenses by notifying Executive Director John C. Baldwin, 645 South 200 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 or at jbaldwin@utahbar.org.

Tax Notice

Pursuant to Internal Revenue Code 6033(e)(1), no income tax deduction shall be allowed for that portion of the annual license fees allocable to lobbying or legislative-related expenditures.  These amounts are updated annually as part of the Utah State Bar license renewal process and are provided through the Utah Bar Journal and upon the licensing form instructions for the current licensing year.

Although the Utah State Bar can’t comment on specifics of current attorney discipline investigations because of Utah Supreme Court confidentiality rules, the Bar wants everyone to understand how the process works and to know how important ethics are to the legal profession.

If you see potential ethics violations in public court records, in the media, or on the Internet, you can notify the Office of Professional Conduct (OPC). This may not be necessary, however, as the OPC watches for such incidents, and it can initiate an investigation and prosecute without a Bar complaint.

If you write to the OPC without any first-hand experience or evidence, the OPC may decline to prosecute your specific case, but may continue to investigate other cases with more evidence regarding the same respondent (the accused attorney).

Similarly, the OPC may dismiss a Bar complaint if other overlapping cases have more evidence or witnesses.

Because of the confidentiality rules, the OPC can not describe the specifics of these overlapping notifications and complaints, but it is important to understand that a decline-to-prosecute decision or a dismissal is not necessarily a vindication of the respondent, especially if there are ongoing investigations or prosecutions by other entities.

By waiting for these external proceedings to conclude, the OPC will have the most evidence for presenting cases to the Ethics and Discipline Committee screening panel (which includes non-lawyers), and, potentially, the district court. In some cases, the OPC may elect to wait, due to respondents being reluctant to risk incriminating themselves on criminal charges, so they would be less likely to cooperate with investigations. Also, the rules allow respondents to request that OPC cases be put on hold while other proceedings unfold. Therefore, the rules prevent the OPC from unilaterally setting timetables for prosecutions.

Because of the confidentiality rules, you may not hear about OPC investigating a case or preparing for a screening panel hearing. There may be no public announcement until the Ethics and Discipline Committee orders a public reprimand to be issued or a civil suit is filed. We should never come to the false conclusion that silence on OPC investigations means there is inactivity on a pending investigation or that an investigation is not underway.

Visit http://www.utcourts.gov/resources/rules/ucja/#Chapter_13 to see the Utah Supreme Court’s ethics rules for attorneys, Rules of Profession Conduct; then scroll down to Chapter 14, Articles 5 to see the Rules of Lawyer Discipline and Disability, which directs the attorney discipline process.

If you have questions, comments, or suggested changes for any rules, please contact Utah State Court Appellate Court Administrator James Ishida at jamesi@utcourts.gov or Steven Johnson, Advisory Committee on the Rules of Professional Conduct Chair at stevejohnson5336@comcast.net.

Appropriate rule changes often take months of discussion by the rules committee before a final draft is presented to the Utah Supreme Court for its approval. After the Court hears the recommendation, the proposed rule is posted for public comment. If no comments are received—or if the comments are all favorable to the rule and if the Court favors the proposed change—it will be adopted by the Court. It there are opposing comments, the Court usually asks the rules committee to review and respond to them; then the Court makes its final decision. It is through this painstaking process that, under the direction of the Utah Supreme Court, attorneys and non-attorneys have developed an effective and fair set of ethics rules and procedures for attorney discipline.

Beneplace 

Beneplace is an independent gateway for Utah State Bar lawyers and their families to access a wide variety of services, products and benefits at discounted rates offered by other companies. Neither the Utah State Bar nor Beneplace promotes nor endorses and is not responsible for any of these services, products or benefits. Although the website is maintained by Beneplace, any problems with the site or the benefit providers should be directed to them by using the Feedback Form or by calling 800-683-2886.