eBulletin for November 2015


Double your pleasure at the new two-day Fall Forum in Salt Lake City, Thursday & Friday, November 19 & 20.  CLE registration.  Hotel reservations.

Share a registration; pay $350 and each attend one day.  Contact Connie at 801-297-7033 or cle@utahbar.org.

Congratulations to Fall Forum award winners Tara Isaacson, McKette Allred, Mark Tolman, Scott Hansen, Anne Burkholder, and the Disaster Legal Response Committee.  Awards will be presented this Thursday and Friday morning.  Details.

If you have time constraints, just come for lunch:  Kimberly Papillon’s Neuroscience of Decision-Making in the Practice of Law on Thursday, 12:15 to 3:15 p.m.; $75.  Lunch sign-up.

On Thursday evening, enjoy the 2015 UMBA Scholarship & Awards Banquet at the Grand America; cocktails at 6:00 p.m. and dinner at 7:00 p.m.  Participate.

On Friday, attend the Meet the Judges Reception in the Federal Courthouse lobby; open bar from 5-6:45 p.m.

Attorneys:  Included with the Fall Forum or register just for the reception ($25).

Judges:  No charge; please R.S.V.P to Connie at 801-297-7033 or cle@utahbar.org.

More great CLE; including section luncheons and CLE seminars; don’t miss:

Pretrial Practices, November 24, 4-6:00 p.m.; 2 credits; $50 ($25 for YLD); snacks and drinks; at the Bar; register.

See some winter sun at the Southern Utah Bar Association 13th Annual All-Day CLE on December 4; 7 credits and 2 ethics (pending); breakfast and lunch provided; $140 for SUBA, $175 for others; details.  Register with your name and bar number to subaboard@gmail.com.

Refresh your winter tan at the Spring Convention in St. George, March 10-12.

Add some surf to your sun at the Summer Convention in San Diego, July 6-9 at Loews Coronado Bay; reservations.  Follow us on Facebook.

Altruistic opportunities:

Kudos to Smith Hartvigsen, Justice Himonas, Rori Hendrix, and others who were honored by the U’s Pro Bono Initiative; details and to Chuck Carlston and Eva Brady who received awards from the Fourth District Court Pro Bono Committee; details.

Volunteers needed!  Debtor’s Clinic; free brief-legal-advice clinic for bankruptcy and debt collection; second Tuesday each month, 5-7:00 p.m. at the Horizonte School; probono@utahbar.orgModest Means Lawyer Referral program; qualified participants pay up to $75 an hour; register.  Sign up to take Pro Bono cases sourced by judges and partner agencies; register.

Please support the Annual Firm Campaign for “AND JUSTICE FOR ALL.”  Donate.

And support “AND JUSTICE FOR ALL” by shopping at Amazon.com and Smith’s; you just shop and they make small donations!  Link your Amazon account and/or Smith’s Reward Card to AJFA.

Take advantage of your Bar Benefits:

Casemaker users now have access to over six million pleadings.  Five pleadings a month free, then $1.99 per.  Review the first page of any pleading for free.  Sign up for this free Bar benefit (click on the Casemaker logo).

Group benefits and current deals (the first time you click on a “View Deal” you will be logged into benefits and subsequent clicks will take you to the specific offer).

Bar Convention in Sun Valley – please come!

Dear Colleagues:

election2013_JGilsonIt’s not too late to register to attend the Bar’s Summer Convention in Sun Valley on July 29 – August 1: great location, great CLE and recreation opportunities, and a chance to socialize with colleagues and meet new ones.

This year has been an immersion in the history and influences of Magna Carta, and two keynote speakers will continue that discussion.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy will speak about Magna Carta on July 30, and has agreed to a Q&A session.  Justice Thomas referred to Magna Carta extensively in his recent dissent in the same sex marriage case Obergefell v. Hodges (in defining “liberty”), so there could be some very current questions about this 800 year-old document.

Thomas Lund, Professor of Law at the S. J. Quinney College of Law, will speak on “Magna Carta: The Rule of Law in Early Common Law Litigation” on August 1.  Professor Lund wrote The Creation of the Common Law: The Medieval Year Books Deciphered.  About this recently-published book, Prof. Stephen Presser of Northwestern wrote: “This amazing and delightful book will be of profound interest to anyone who has ever believed that the rule of law is about more than the arbitrary machinations of politicians.  Simply stated, Thomas Lund has given us one of the most important works on law in this generation.”

Also, on July 31, Utah State Climatologist Dr. Robert Gillies will speak about climate change and water issues in the West.

For more on the keynote speakers and the entire CLE schedule, lodging, and registration, see http://summerconvention.utahbar.org/.

I hope to see you in Sun Valley!

Jim Gilson
Bar President

The Guardianship Signature Program Invitation


2015_guardianship_logo_lgto help pioneer the newest signature program endorsed by the Board of District Court Judges and the Bar Commission.

The Guardianship Signature Program provides judges with a list of lawyers who are willing to represent respondents in guardianship and conservatorship proceedings. The representation is for free or on a sliding scale if the client’s income qualifies, or for reasonable and necessary attorney fees if the client’s income is more than 300% of the federal poverty guidelines.

To volunteer for this Signature Program, visit:
and select both the Guardianship Signature Program and
the districts where you are willing to accept appointments.

Additional information & a free online training are available on the Utah State Courts website at http://www.utcourts.gov/howto/family/gc/signature/ 

e.Bulletin for May 2015


Congratulations to the following who were elected to the Board of Bar Commissioners:  Rob Rice as Bar President-elect, Kate Conyers and Michelle Mumford representing the Third Division, Liisa Hancock in the Fourth Division, and Kristin Woods for the Fifth Division.  Thanks to all of the candidates for great campaigns and thoughtful involvement in the Bar and the profession.

Bar President Elect Angelina Tsu and Commissioner Rob Rice are co-chairs of the Bar’s Affordable Attorneys for All task force, formed to develop new solutions to make legal services more accessible to the middle class.  The AAA task force is looking for volunteer lawyers in our Bar, and non-lawyers in our community, to serve on this critical committee.  This new initiative represents an excellent opportunity to help shape the practice of law in Utah, strengthen our profession, and improve access to justice in Utah.  Please write to adminasst@utahbar.org if you would like to participate.  AAA will focus on:

  • Developing sustainable business models for lawyers to provide affordable legal services;
  • Expanding lawyers’ ability to provide unbundled legal services through innovative community lawyering programs;
  • Building an effective web-based communications solution to connect clients to affordable legal services;
  • Partnering with the Legislature to identify ways to expand legal services that are affordable to all;
  • Joining with Utah law schools to assist law school graduates in the transition to a sustainable law practice.

The schedule for the Summer Convention in Sun Valley on July 29-August 1 is now available, and we have a great program built around US Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy’s keynote address.  Watch your mailbox for the printed schedule in the Bar Journal soon.  Online registration is now available.  See Sun Valley lodging options and online lodging reservations(Sun Valley’s Utah State Bar page takes a few moments to load).

Is your business prepared for a disaster?  Are you aware of your ethical obligations regarding disaster planning?  The Disaster Legal Response Committee is offering a 1 hour ethics CLE on disaster planning, Wednesday, June 17, noon, at the Bar.  This event is free to those who are willing to be a volunteer with the committee; $25 for all others; online registration.  Learn more about developing plans for providing pro bono legal services to low-income individuals and small businesses following a disaster:  useful materials.

The National Center for State Courts’ report on the Impact of the Revisions to Rule 26 on Discovery Practice in the Utah District Courts is now available.  Download the complete report; among the findings:

  • The revisions appear to have had a positive impact on civil case management in the form of fewer discovery disputes in cases other than debt collection and domestic relations, as well as reductions in time to disposition across all case types and tiers. Compliance with the standard discovery restrictions appears to be high, although there are suggestions that some parties may be stipulating around the restrictions without seeking court approval.
  • The number of Tier 1 cases fell, while the number of Tier 2 and 3 cases increased, yet the proportion of judgments of less than $50,000 was significantly higher after the changes than before.
  • The settlement rate increased between 13 and 18 percent, depending on the tier.  The expanded disclosures provide litigants with sufficient information to engage in more productive settlement negotiations.
  • (more…)

e.Bulletin for March 2015



In April, we will have an opportunity to vote for a new Bar President-elect and Third, Fourth, and Fifth Divisions Bar Commissioners.  Please visit election details for information on the candidates.  Here is the field of excellent candidates:


  • President-elect:  Robert Rice and Tom Seiler
  • Third Division Commissioner (two openings):  Kate Conyers, Janise Macanas, and Michelle Mumford
  • Fourth Division Commissioner (one opening):  Liisa Hancock and Tom Seiler
  • Fifth Division Commissioner (one opening):  Aaron Randall and Katie Woods

Also in April, the Magna Carta Traveling Exhibit will be touring Utah.  Local Bar associations are putting together some great events in St. George, Orem, Logan, and Ogden; click here for the exhibit schedule.  And for those on the Wasatch Front, please stop by after work on Friday, April 3, from 4 to 6:00 p.m. to see the exhibit and enjoy a reception at the Utah Law and Justice Center, 645 S. 200 E, SLC.  We are planning a Magna Carta Gala Celebration on the evening of April 14 at Rice Eccles Stadium, where Chief Justice Durrant and Governor Herbert will be speaking.  Please write to magnacarta@utahbar.org if you are interested in attending.  We are looking forward to hearing what Utah students write about Magna Carta; please encourage students in grades 8-12 to participate by March 30.  For information, see competitions.

Be part of the special Law Day/Magna Carta special edition in The Salt Lake Tribune and Deseret News on April 26.  For suggestions on editorial content, please write to sean.toomey@utahbar.org.  For advertising opportunities see Law Day or contact Ken Stowe at kstowe@utahmediagroup.com or 801-204-6382.

Now that winter is finally here, we have an added incentive to attend the Spring Convention on March 12-14 in St. George.  Online registration deadline is this Monday, March 9; walk-in registration will be available.  See schedule and registration; a “Utah State Bar” rate of $111 is still available at the Comfort Inn .4 miles from the convention, 435-628-8544.  And don’t forget the Second Annual Quinn Essential—the Judge Quinn Memorial Awareness Bicycle Ride on Friday, March 13, at 3:30 in St. George.  Net proceeds to be donated to “AND JUSTICE FOR ALL” and to publicize distracted driver and bike safety.  See details at The Quinn Essential.

New this year is an exciting Bar App to aide your convention experience:  Utah State Bar Spring 15 App is now available at the Apple App Store and at Google Play.  It will provide a current agenda, access to materials, and information on speakers, vendors, and sponsors, as well as tools that will allow you to find and chat with other attendees, provide real-time feedback to speakers, interact with your social media accounts, and receive convention announcements. Later this month, watch for new mobile web app that will allow you to manage your Bar account, track MCLE status, find colleagues, and register for upcoming events.

The Summer Convention planning committee is putting together a great program around U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy’s keynote for our Summer Convention in Sun Valley on July 29-August 1.  See Sun Valley lodging options and online reservations (The Sun Valley reservations page for the Utah State Bar may take a few moments to load.)

First Annual New Lawyer Introduction to the Scott M. Matheson Courthouse

Please join the Litigation Section for the first annual New Lawyer Introduction to the Scott M. Matheson Courthouse on February 27, 2015.  4 hours CLE pending.  The tentative schedule is set forth below:

8:30-9:30:  Donut reception with Judges and Litigation Section Board

9:30-10:30:  Pet peeves, best practices, and tips from the law clerks

10:30-11:15: Introduction to Resources available at the Court (Presented by Maureen Minson from the law library)

11:15-12:15:  An introduction to the clerk’s office and what new lawyers should know about filing cases

12:15-1:30:  Lunch and courthouse tour

1:30 to 3:00:  Courtroom observation

Price: $30 for members of the Litigation Section.  Become a member here

$150 for non-members.

Register HERE

Students Can Sign Up to be a Judge for a Day


January 29, 2015

Contact: Nancy Volmer
(801) 578-3994
Cell:(801) 712-4545


Salt Lake City, UT—The Utah State Courts are planning the 10th Annual “Judge for a Day,” program in recognition of Law Day, which is celebrated on May 1, 2015. On May 1, 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower proclaimed the first Law Day as a day of national dedication to the principle of government under law.

Utah high school students are selected to participate in the program based on an essay, civic involvement resume or teacher nomination letter. For students who choose to write an essay the Law Day theme is “Magna Carta: Symbol of Freedom Under Law.”  Perhaps more than any other document in human history, the Magna Carta has come to embody a simple but enduring truth: No one, no matter how powerful, is above the law.

Students selected to participate in the program will be paired with a judge in one of the state’s eight judicial districts for one day in either April or May. The students will be given a behind-the-scenes look at court operations, which include observing court proceedings and a judge at work.

Students are asked to submit an application form by March 6, 2015. Application forms and additional information are available on the court’s Web site at www.utcourts.gov/media/lawday.

Judging the Judges

ParkCity residents will have the opportunity on Tuesday of voting whether to retain a number of Utah state judges, including Judge Ryan Harris, who serves in Summit, Salt Lake, and Tooele Counties, and presided over the lawsuit between Park City Mountain Resort and Talisker Land Holdings, LLC.  As one recent article in the Park Record suggested [PCMR v. Talisker: the Judge Faces Voters on Election Day], “[if] voters are unhappy with the judge, they could sign a de facto eviction order against Harris on Election Day.”  A clever turn of phrase, but this statement suggests that voters should not vote to retain a judge where they take issue with the outcome in a specific case.  We disagree.  Instead, we urge voters to take a different, more principled approach.

As citizens, we understand that the rule of law involves a delicate balance of powers between our three branches of government: the legislative branch, which makes the law; the executive branch, which enforces it; and the judicial branch, which interprets and applies the law. Utah’s Code of Judicial Conduct points out that “The United States legal system is based upon the principle that an independent, impartial, and competent judiciary, composed of men and women of integrity, will interpret and apply the law that governs our society.  Thus, the judiciary plays a central role in preserving the principles of justice and the rule of law.” Accordingly, a judge should be evaluated upon an objective analysis of his or her legal ability, integrity, and impartiality, rather than voting based upon whether they are unhappy with a particular decision or, as in the PCMR v. Talisker case, the outcome settled upon by the parties themselves.

But how should we judge a judge? In our view, voters should consider a judge’s legal ability, integrity, temperament, and commitment to procedural fairness and the rule of law, in the cumulative context of the judge’s work.  We suggest consideration of more objective information that may assist you in making your decision in the voting booth: the assessment of the Park Record’s editorial board, which includes the candid feedback of a lawyer who appeared before Judge Harris in the PCMR case, and his judicial performance evaluations.

The September 12, 2014 Park Record editorial in the immediate aftermath of the settlement of the ski resort case referred to Judge Harris’s “Solomon-like wisdom” and his “hewing close to Utah’s strict lease laws.”  One of the lawyers in the PCMR/ Talisker case quoted in the Park Record editorial also concluded: “Harris showed that justice is best served when everyone is treated equally under the law.”  The editorial continued, “There are probably many lessons to be gained from the high-drama dispute that dominated Park City this summer. But the most salient one may have less to do with the importance of the town’s ski areas than a perceptive judge’s admonishment that we all have to work together to succeed.”

It is also very important to highlight that the Utah Judicial Performance Evaluation Commission—using data drawn from surveys of attorneys who appeared before him, jurors, and court staff—unanimously recommended Judge Harris’s retention.  Judge Harris scored higher than the average of his district court peers in all survey categories.  The complete  report regarding several Utah judges, including Judge Harris, can be accessed at www.judges.utah.gov.

President-Elect Angelina Tsu named to NAPABA Best Under 40 List

Utah State Bar President-elect Angelina Tsu One of the Best Lawyers Under 40

 National Asian Pacific American Bar Association recognizes 21 attorneys in U.S.

The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) has selected 21 attorneys to receive the 2014 Best Lawyers Under 40 Award, including Utah State Bar President-elect Angelina Tsu.  The award recognizes talented individuals who have achieved prominence and distinction in their respective fields while demonstrating a strong commitment to the community at relatively early stages in their careers.

Angelina Tsu, who has served on the Utah State Bar Board of Commissioners since 2010, was sworn in as president-elect in July.  She co-chaired the Bar’s Committee for Civics Education and served as President of the Young Lawyers Division.  She currently serves on the Boards of Women Lawyers of Utah, the Association of Corporate Counsel (Mountain West Division), and the Utah Minority Bar Foundation.  She is a member of the Merit Selection Panel, which is the judicial nominating commission for Federal Magistrate Judges.

Tsu is Vice President and Legal Counsel at Zions Bancorporation.  Prior to joining Zions, she practiced with the law firm of Ray Quinney & Nebeker and served as a judicial clerk to the Honorable Dee V. Benson of the United States District Court for the District of Utah.

Utah State Bar President James Gilson said that “The young lawyers of the Bar represent the future of the profession, and I am very pleased that Angelina has been recognized for her contributions.  She has provided great service to the Utah Bar.”

The NAPABA stated that “This year’s honorees have vast and varied experiences – founding their own law firms, trying and winning major cases, representing Fortune 100 companies, combating human trafficking, and advocating to protect the civil rights of Asian Pacific Americans.”  The award will be presented on November 8, 2014, during its annual convention in Scottsdale, Arizona.

The Utah State Bar was established in 1931 and regulates the practice of law under the authority of the Utah Supreme Court.  The 11,500 lawyers of the Bar serve the public and legal profession with excellence, civility, and integrity.  They envision a just legal system that is understood, valued, and accessible to all.  Visit www.utahbar.org for more information.

Sean Toomey, Communications Director
Utah State Bar, Lawyers working for justice.
645 South 200 East, Salt Lake City, UT84111
www.utahbar.org 801-297-7059 sean.toomey@utahbar.org


e.Bulletin for October 2014

election2013_JGilsonThanks to the 200 judges, lawyers, law students, and law school staff who participated in the Constitution Day Teach-in.  They taught 300 classes throughout Utah, a 50% increase from last year.  Our next school civics project will be Magna Carta essay and video contests.  We will present student awards at the traveling exhibit Magna Carta: Enduring Legacy 1215-2015 as it makes stops throughout Utah in April.  Watch for upcoming details at http://lawday.utahbar.org/ about the contests and the exhibit schedule.

The November 20-21 Fall Forum is happening soon.  See these links for the schedule and to register (you will be directed there once you are logged into your Bar account).  The Ethics Forum and the Meet Your Judges Mixer on Thursday evening, November 20, is not to be missed. All state, federal, and justice court judges, as well as commissioners and magistrates, have been invited to attend.

We are still seeking nominations for the following awards presented at the Fall Forum:

Community Member of the Year:  to recognize outstanding service by a non-lawyer toward better public understanding of the legal profession and the administration of justice, the judiciary, or the legislative process.  Please submit to nominations@utahbar.org by 5 p.m. on Thursday, October 9.

Pro Bono Lawyer of the Year:  to recognize an attorney who has provided or enabled legal services, free of charge, for Utah’s most vulnerable citizens—people living in poverty, individuals with disabilities, veterans, seniors, minorities, and victims of domestic violence.  Write to probono@utahbar.org for a nomination form; deadline for nominations is 5 p.m. on Wednesday, October 15th.

Speaking of pro bono, the National Pro Bono Celebration is October 19-24.  See http://www.probono.net/celebrateprobono/.  Contact michelle.harvey@utahbar.org to participate in Utah volunteer opportunities or events:

Friday, October 10

  • First District Pro Bono Open House, 6 p.m., Italian Place in Logan

Monday, October 21

  • Awards Luncheon, Noon, S.J. Quinney College of Law, Sutherland Moot Courtroom

Tuesday, October 22

  • Street Law Legal Clinic, 5 p.m., Horizonte School Cafeteria, 1234 South Main Street, Volunteer Opportunity!
  • Tuesday Night Bar, 5:30 p.m., Law and Justice Center, Volunteer Opportunity!
  • Tuesday Night Bar Reception, 5:30 p.m., Utah Valley University Library, Lakeview Room, Volunteer Opportunity!

We’re also seeking nominations for members of the Bar for the Heart & Hands Award to acknowledge those who make significant contributions to the community through volunteer or philanthropic service.  The Utah Philanthropy Day luncheon will honour award recipients and others on November 13 at Little America; tickets here.  Please submit nominations to nominations@utahbar.org by 5 p.m. on Thursday, October 9.

Your Board of Utah Bar Commissioners has established its 2014-15 priorities as follows:

1.   Improving Access to Justice:

Pro Bono Commission & Modest Means Lawyer Referral

2.  Advocating for the Judiciary

3.   Reviewing Bar Operations:

OPC, Summer Convention, New Lawyer Training & Budget

4.   Planning for the Future of the Profession

5.  Celebrating Magna Carta/Rule of Law

6.  Supporting Diversity

Utah State Bar CasemakerPro Free Upgrade

The Utah State Bar is pleased to announce the addition of Casemaker’s suite of premium services to the Utah Casemaker library, at no cost to attorneys and paralegal members of the Bar.  Now, you have access to not only Casemaker’s broad and comprehensive libraries which cover all 50 states and Federal materials, but you also have access to a suite of tools that make research faster and easier. These premium services include Casecheck+, CiteCheck, and CasemakerDigest, and these, as well as the basic Casemaker research tool, are available at no cost to members.

Casecheck+ works like Shephard’s® and KeyCite® to notify you instantly of negative treatment, and identify whether your case law citations are still good law. Casecheck+ returns both positive and negative treatments instantly as you research and links to negative treatments, so you can quickly review the citation history for both state and federal cases. It works seamlessly inside the new Casemaker and doesn’t require any extra steps to use.

CiteCheck analyzes every citation in your brief (or your opponent’s) and provides you with a report of good law, negative treatments, and potential citation format errors. In just moments, you can have this crucial information.

CasemakerDigest allows members to receive daily summaries of the latest state and federal appellate decisions (within 12-24 hours of publication), classified by practice area. Choose one area, a few, or all, and get exactly the information you need when you need it.

If you previously had a paid subscription to any of these products there is nothing you need to do. You will no longer be charged for the service and it will continue working as it had before. If any payments were pre-paid, they will be refunded by Casemaker Legal.

Access to your Casemaker account will continue through the new Utah State Bar member site located at https://services.utahbar.org. Just log in and go to Members to access the Casemaker link.

In The News – 4Utah – Program hopes to provide access to affordable legal services



Have you ever found yourself in need of a lawyer? Were nervous of high costs and a lack of guaranteed results? The Utah state bar has a program that could help: It’s called the Modest Means Lawyers Referral Program. John Lund talks more about the program. For more information click here.

In The News – 4Utah – The Modest Means Lawyers Referral Program

The Utah State Bar was established in 1931. It is a non-profit organization authorized by the Utah Supreme Court to regulate the practice of law, including admissions, education , and discipline. Its 11,000 lawyers serve the public and profession with excellence, civility, and integrity. They envision a just legal system that is understood, valued, and accessible to all.

The Modest Means Lawyers Referral program was created to make lawyers more accessible to more people

The Bar has added a new Access to Justice program, complementing the Pro Bono Commission which encourages attorneys to donate free services for those with incomes less than 125% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines (Bar doesn’t coordinate referrals).

  • Modest Means Lawyers Referral program helps those with non-extensive assets and who make from 125% to 300% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines (for example, up to $70,000 for a family of four).
  • Program provides referrals to lawyers who will charge hourly rates of up to $50 or $75.
  • More people are self-representing in court; nearly 50% appear for divorces without lawyers.
  • It’s difficult for a layperson to be effective because of the complexity of the law and the rules of evidence and procedure.
  • Program lawyers can provide limited-scope representation, such as coaching, appearing at a critical hearing, or reviewing documents that the client creates.
  • Limited representation and reduced fees give nearly everyone access to competent legal assistance (if not qualified for this program, someone has access to free services or has resources to hire a lawyer).
  • Interested parties should visit www.utahbar.org/abc4 (http://www.utahbar.org/public-services/modest-meansprogram/
  • modest-means-do-i-qualify/) to see if they qualify.

Notice of Proposed Amendments to Utah Court Rules

The Utah Supreme Court invites comments to proposed amendments to the following court rules. The comment period expires March 14, 2014.

Summary of proposed amendments

URCrP 007. Proceedings before magistrate. Amend. Conforms the rule to existing practices. Authorizes a magistrate to issue a material witness warrant at the same time bail is fixed. Clarifies that a material witness may not be detained if the person cannot post bail and that the witness’s testimony may be taken by deposition.

URCrP 038. Appeals from justice court to district court. Amend. Reflects that citations are now efiled and, therefore, that an abstract of a citation will be included in the record on appeal.

URCrP 040. Search warrants. Amend. Makes all sealed search warrants public after six months. The prosecutor or law enforcement officer may apply for additional six month sealing periods. If documents have been sealed for three years or more, an individual may seek to indefinitely seal the documents.

USB 14-0510. Prosecution and appeals. Amend. Provides the time in which the respondent to an ethics complaint may respond to an exception filed by OPC.

How to view redline text of the proposed amendments

To see proposed rule amendments and to submit comments, click on this link to:  http://www.utcourts.gov/resources/rules/comments/. Then click on the rule number.

How to submit comments

You can comment and view the comments of others by clicking on the “comments” link associated with each body of rules. It is most efficient if you submit comments through the website, and you are encouraged to do so. After clicking on the comment link, you will be prompted for your name, which we request, and your email address which need not be your real address. The comment website is public. Although all comments will be considered, they will not be acknowledged with a response.

After you submit your comment on the webpage, you may get an error message, but your comment has been delivered to a buffer, and I will publish it at the earliest opportunity.

Submit comments directly through the website or to:

Alison Adams-Perlac
Email: alisonap@utcourts.gov
Please include the comment in the message text, not in an attachment.
Fax:    801-578-3843
Administrative Office of the Courts
POB 140241
Salt Lake City, Utah  84114-0241

One method of submitting a comment is sufficient.