Ethics Advisory Opinion 15-02

Utah State Bar

Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee

Opinion Number 15-02

Issued February 10, 2015

 

PROPRIETY OF EX PARTE CONTACT WITH INDIVIDUALS WITHIN AN ORGANIZATION

ISSUE

1.  May an attorney representing a party in pending or existing litigation contact servants, agents, and employees of an organization, which is the opposing party, to discuss issues directly related to the litigation, if the attorney is aware the organization is represented by counsel in the matter?  Is it ethical for an attorney to make contact directly with in-house or corporate counsel, even if the attorney is aware that the organization is represented by outside counsel in the matter?  Is it ethical for an attorney to send a copy of correspondence or email to an organization’s employee where the original is directed to opposing counsel?
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Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 13-01


UTAH STATE BAR

ETHICS ADVISORY OPINION COMMITTEE

Opinion No. 13-01

Issued April 9, 2013

ISSUE

When a lawsuit or claim is filed against a government entity, the attorney’s office of that entity sends all relevant employees an e-mail including a litigation hold notice and certain questions regarding the location of documents possibly relevant to the pending claim.  If the claim has been brought by an employee, such as an employment discrimination claim, the complaining employee would also receive the e-mail.  In this situation, does the attorney’s office sending this e-mail to all relevant employees, including a represented plaintiff or complaining employee, constitute a violation of Utah Rule of Professional Conduct 4.2?
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Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 07-02

(Approved February 25, 1993)
Issue:
May an attorney give a “second opinion” on a legal matter, when approached by a non-client who is represented by counsel?

Opinion: Rule 4.2 of the Rules of Professional Conduct prohibits a lawyer, “[i]n representing a client,” from “communicat[ing] about the subject of the representation with a party the lawyer knows to be represented by another lawyer in the matter.” A lawyer does not violate the letter or purposes of this rule by rendering a second opinion on a legal matter, when the lawyer is not “representing a client” on the same subject. However, the lawyer should make every effort neither to impair the first attorney-client relationship nor to use the consultation as a means of soliciting the represented party. (more…)

04-04 – In litigation to enforce an oral contract allegedly made by a corporate defendant’s former employee

August 25, 2004

1 Issue: In litigation to enforce an oral contract allegedly made by a corporate defendant’s former employee on behalf of the corporation, where the former employee was not a member of the control group, may the plaintiff’s attorney contact the ex-employee without the consent of the corporate defendant’s attorney?

2 Answer: The contact with the former employee is not unethical. Utah Rules of Professional Conduct 4.2 (2004) does not bar a lawyer’s unauthorized contact with former employees of a represented corporate defendant except in very limited circumstances not applicable to this opinion.
3 Facts: A corporate defendant is represented by a lawyer in the defense of a claim based on an oral agreement allegedly made by a former employee of the corporate defendant while employed by the corporate defendant. The former employee was not a member of the “control group” as this term is defined in Utah Rules of Professional Conduct 4.2(c) (2) (2004), but the former employee did have authority to enter into contracts. The former employee is not separately represented by legal counsel with respect to the matter. We are asked whether the lawyer representing the corporate defendant represents the former employee with respect to the matter under Rule 4.2(c)(1)(B)(iii), thereby precluding plaintiff’s counsel from communicating with the former employee with respect to the matter without complying with Rule 4.2(a).
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Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 04-06

December 2, 2004
Issue:
Under what circumstances is it permissible for corporate counsel to assert that counsel concurrently represents present and former corporate employees whose testimony is relevant to a claim and ethically preclude opposing counsel’s access to those corporate employee witnesses?

Opinion: If corporate counsel has actually formed an attorney-client relationship with these employee-witnesses, and has fully complied with Utah Rules of Professional Conduct 1.7 (including obtaining informed consent from all multiple clients to joint representation and informing them of the possible need for withdrawal from representing any of them should an actual conflict arise), this is permissible and opposing counsel may not interview them. However, in the absence of such a fully formed and proper attorney-client relationship, it is improper for corporate counsel to block opposing counsel’s access to other current corporate constituents, by asserting an attorney-client relationship unless these individuals were control group members, their acts could be imputed to the organization or their statement would bind the corporation with respect to the matter under Utah Rules of Professional Conduct 4.2. Similarly, it is improper to block opposing counsel’s access to any former employee in the absence of a current fully formed and proper attorney-client relationship. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 00-05

(Approved December 1, 2000)
¶ 1 Issue:
Where a defendant is being represented by a lawyer appointed by defendant’s insurance carrier prior to the entry of any judgment against the defendant, would it be ethical for plaintiff’s lawyer to convey a settlement offer proposing that plaintiff take an assignment of any bad-faith claim that the defendant might have against the insurance carrier in exchange for plaintiff’s agreement not to execute against defendant for amounts exceeding the insurance policy limits?

¶ 2 Opinion: It is ethical for plaintiff’s lawyer to communicate this offer of settlement to the defendant so long as the communication complies with Utah Rules of Professional Conduct 4.1 and 4.2. If the offer of settlement creates a conflict of interest for the defendant’s insurance carrier-appointed lawyer, then the defendant’s lawyer must fully comply with Rule 1.7. Counsel’s presentation of plaintiff’s settlement offer to advance plaintiff’s interests is not unethical, even though it may place defendant’s counsel in a conflict of interest. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 98-07

(Approved August 7, 1998)
Issue:
May the lawyer for the plaintiff in a personal-injury case directly contact the adjuster for defendant’s insurer without first obtaining the consent of the defendant’s attorney?

Opinion: Such a contact is improper if the lawyer for the plaintiff knows or reasonably should know that the insurer is represented by counsel in the case, either when the insurer has separate counsel or when it is represented by the same counsel as defendant. If defendant’s attorney does not also represent the insurer, plaintiff’s attorney need not obtain the consent of defendant’s attorney to contact the insurer or its attorney.
Analysis: Rule 4.2 of the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct prohibits a lawyer, in representing a client, from communicating “about the subject of the representation with a party the lawyer knows to be represented by another lawyer in the matter, unless the lawyer has the consent of the other lawyer or is authorized by law to do so.” (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 96-01

(Approved April 26, 1996)
Issue:
May a lawyer representing a defendant in multiple lawsuits asserting similar claims initiate and conduct ex parte communications with former plaintiffs who have settled their claims?

Opinion: Yes, but only if the settling plaintiffs are not represented by counsel and only after appropriate disclosures have been made by the lawyer to the settling plaintiffs.
Facts: A lawyer’s corporate client has been and is a defendant in multiple civil lawsuits. Certain lawsuits have been settled and others are pending. Most of the current lawsuits were filed by the same plaintiffs’ lawyers who represented the individuals whose claims have been settled.1
The lawyer’s client believes that random audits of the records of current claimants reveal a lack of basis for many of the claims asserted. The client desires to bring an action against the claimant lawyers who, in the client’s view, have asserted meritless current claims. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 95-05

(Approved January 26, 1996)
Issue.
What is the relationship between Rule of Professional Conduct 4.2 and a 1994 U.S. Department of Justice regulation purporting to authorize certain ex parte contacts with persons known to be represented by counsel?

Issue No. 2:
Assuming that the Regulation does not constitute a “law” for purposes of Rule 4.2, under what conditions may a government lawyer make ex parte contact with persons known to be represented by counsel?

Issue No. 1:
Is the definition of “represented party” in § 77.3(a) of the Regulation consistent with the definition of “party” in Rule 4.2 of the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct? In other words, does Rule 4.2 apply only to ex parte contacts with a party in an adversary proceeding. (more…)