Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 05-01

April 28, 2005
1 Issue:
A former client of an attorney moved the trial court to set aside the former client’s previous guilty plea on the basis that the attorney’s prior advice on accepting the prosecution’s plea offer had “confused” him. May the attorney testify concerning the previous discussions with the former client to prevent a possible fraud upon the court or to protect the attorney’s good name and reputation?

2 Opinion: Absent a court order requiring the attorney’s testimony, and notwithstanding a subpoena served on the attorney by the prosecution, the attorney may not divulge any attorney-client information, either to the prosecution or in open court. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 05-02

Issued April 28, 2005
1 Issue:
What is the ethical responsibility of an attorney serving as defense counsel in a criminal case, when expressly requested by the court at a sentencing hearing for information obtained from or about the defendant regarding the defendant’s prior convictions?

2 Opinion: An attorney may only answer such a query with the client’s informed consent. Otherwise, the attorney must respectfully decline to answer the court’s request in a manner that will not be misleading to the court. The attorney may respond by asserting the client’s right to remain silent, and the attorney’s ethical responsibilities or a by giving a similar explanation that does not disclose client confidences. 1 (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 05-03

September 30, 2005
HISTORY:
On May 6, 2005, the Utah Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee issued Utah Ethics Advisory Op. No. 05-03, 2005 WL 4748681 (Utah St. Bar). The Requestors of the Opinion filed a Petition for Review with the Board of Bar Commissioners pursuant § III(e)(1) of the Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee Rules of Procedure and § VI(a)(1) of the Utah State Bar Rules Governing the Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee. At a meeting of the Board of Bar Commissioners of the Utah State Bar on July 13, 2005, the Commission reviewed the conclusions and analysis of the majority view and the minority view of Opinion No. 05-03, and voted to issue a revised opinion, set forth below as Opinion No. 05-03. The initial Opinion No. 05-03 as originally issued by the Committee is appended in its entirety for historical reference only and should not be cited or used for purposes other than background. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 00-06

(Approved September 29, 2000)
¶ 1 Issue:
What are the ethical obligations of an attorney who, unaware his client will lie, hears the client commit perjury or otherwise materially mislead a tribunal?

¶ 2 Opinion: Counsel who knows that a client has materially misled the court may not remain silent and continue to represent the client; to do so would be “assisting” the client in committing a fraud on the court. Rather, counsel is obligated to remonstrate with the client and attempt to persuade the client to rectify the misleading or untruthful statements to the court. If this is unsuccessful, counsel must seek to withdraw. If withdrawal is denied, counsel must disclose the fraud to the court. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 00-06

Opinion No. 00-06
(Approved September 29, 2000)

1 Issue:

What are the ethical obligations of an attorney who, unaware his client will lie, hears the client commit perjury or otherwise materially mislead a tribunal?

2 Opinion: Counsel who knows that a client has materially misled the court may not remain silent and continue to represent the client; to do so would be “assisting” the client in committing a fraud on the court. Rather, counsel is obligated to remonstrate with the client and attempt to persuade the client to rectify the misleading or untruthful statements to the court. If this is unsuccessful, counsel must seek to withdraw. If withdrawal is denied, counsel must disclose the fraud to the court.
(more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 96-09

(Approved November 1, 1996)
Issue:
May an attorney recover attorney’s fees for a collection action pursued on behalf of the attorney’s partner?

Opinion: There is no prohibition against an attorney’s hiring another attorney to collect the debts of the first attorney, even though the two attorneys are in the same law firm. Whether the second attorney may collect attorney’s fees from the debtor is a question of law that the Committee has no authority to decide. If the debt is incurred in connection with legal services provided by the firm of the two lawyers, Utah case law clearly prohibits the recovery. Under other factual circumstances, such as a debt arising out of a lawyer’s non-legal, personal business, the matter would be judicially resolved, but the lawyer attempting to collect such fees has an ethical obligation under the Rules of Professional Conduct-particularly under Rule 3.3(a)(3)-not to mislead the court as to the attorney’s right to collect such fees. (more…)