Ethics Advisory Opinion 13-05

Utah State Bar

 Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee

Opinion Number 13-05

 Issued September 10, 2013

 ISSUE

 

1.         To what extent may an attorney participate in an “on-site” fee/retainer funding program to obtain and finance attorney retainer or litigation funds?

 OPINION

 

2.         A lawyer may not participate in an “on-site” fee/retainer funding program, under the circumstances set forth herein, as such would violate the provisions of Rules of Professional Conduct 1.7(a) (Conflict of Interest: Current Clients), Rule 1.8(a) (Acquire a pecuniary interest adverse to the client).  The lawyer may, however, obtain a waiver of the conflict by complying with the terms of Rules 1.7(b) and 1.8(a), including making full disclosure and obtaining “informed consent” confirmed in writing.  Adequate measures must also be taken to safeguard the lawyer’s independent judgment under Rule 5.4(c) (A third party may not direct or regulate the lawyer’s professional judgment.)
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Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 04-01

March 29, 2004
¶1 Issue:
What action, if any, may a lawyer for an employer ethically undertake on behalf of a vanished former employee who, along with the employer, has been named as a defendant in an action arising when the person was an employee?

¶2 Answer: Under certain narrowly prescribed conditions, an employer’s lawyer may ethically take limited action to protect the interests of the vanished former employee, provided the lack of direct contact with that defendant is brought to the attention of the relevant tribunal.
¶3 Facts: Plaintiff filed suit naming a company and its former employee as defendants. The employer concedes that the former employee was acting in the course and scope of his employment and has asked the company’s lawyers to represent the missing defendant. Absence of a formal answer to the complaint may result in a default judgment being entered against the absent former employee. We have no information about the reasons for the employee’s absence, but we assume that a reasonable effort has been made to locate the person and determine the reason for the absence. We also assume that, at this early stage of the proceeding, the interests of the employer and former employee are not in conflict.1The lawyer requesting this opinion also indicated that the employer has liability insurance that covers the incident giving rise to the lawsuit.2The company has requested that the lawyer represent the missing ex-employee. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 04-01a

December 2, 2004
Amendment of Opinion No. 04-01: On March 29, 2004, the Utah Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee issued Utah Ethics Advisory Op. No. 04-01, 2004 WL 870583 (Utah St. Bar).1 The Office of Professional Conduct of the Utah State Bar filed a petition for review with the Board of Bar Commissioners pursuant to § III(e)(1) of the Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee Rules of Procedure and § VI(a)(1) of the Utah State Bar Rules Governing the Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee. The Commission asked the Committee to reconsider Opinion No. 04-01. Having reviewed the issues raised by the Office of Professional Conduct, we issue this amended opinion, which revises the conclusion and analysis of Opinion No. 04-01. Accordingly, this amended opinion replaces and supersedes Opinion No. 04-01. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 03-04

Issued October 14, 2003
¶1 Issue
: May a lawyer threaten to present criminal charges against an opposing party or witness during negotiations in a private civil matter?

¶2 Opinion: In the course of representing a client in a civil matter, it is not per se unethical for a lawyer to threaten that the client may pursue criminal charges against an adverse party where the civil and criminal matters are related. However, such a threat will be a violation of the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct if it constitutes “extortion,” if the lawyer does not have a reasonable belief that such charges are warranted by the law and the facts, or if it involves “abusive treatment” of a witness. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 96-08

(Approved November 1, 1996)
Issue:
May an attorney represent a person who seeks to obtain payment under the terms of a client-solicitation agreement entered into with another attorney, where the agreement involved the payment of a “finder’s fee” to the person?

Opinion: Although a “finder’s fee” agreement between an attorney and a client may be a violation of Rule 5.4(a) of the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct, the Rule governs the ethical conduct of attorneys . Thus, the solicitation agreement did not violate any duty of the non-lawyer parties under the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct. Therefore, absent a violation of Rule 3.1 concerning non-meritorious actions, the plaintiff’s new attorney may seek recovery under the solicitation agreement on behalf of his non-lawyer client. (more…)