Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 12-01

UTAH STATE BAR ETHICS ADVISORY OPINION COMMITTEE

Opinion No. 12-01
Issued January 10, 2012

ISSUE

1. Three related questions are before the Committee. The attorney states that she separately represented a woman and a man (the “wife” and “husband,” respectively), both prior to their marriage. She subsequently represented both parties after they were married. The parties subsequently went to trial seeking a divorce (the “divorce”). The first question is whether representation of the wife, prior to the marriage of the parties, in litigation (the “separate action”) constitutes a conflict which would preclude the attorney from representing the husband on appeal in the divorce? Second, does the fact that the attorney testified at the divorce trial as a percipient witness, preclude her from representing the husband on appeal. Third, does representation of the wife in litigation involving both husband and wife against a third party during the course of their marriage (the “joint litigation”), wherein, notwithstanding the attorney’s vigorous but unsuccessful advocacy of the wife’s position, the wife was dismissed from the case, preclude the attorney from representing the husband on appeal in the divorce, particularly where the attorney now believes the trial court was correct in dismissing the wife from the joint litigation?
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ETHICS ADVISORY OPINION No. 08-01

OPINION NO. 08-01
MAIN OPINION:
For Dissent Opinion click here>>>
Issued April 8, 2008
1. Issue:
May an attorney provide legal assistance to litigants appearing before a tribunal pro se and prepare written submissions for them without disclosing the nature or extent of such assistance? If so, what are the attorney’s obligations when full representation is not undertaken?

2. Opinion: Under the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct, and in the absence of an express court rule to the contrary, a lawyer may provide legal assistance to litigants appearing before tribunals pro se and help them prepare written submissions without disclosing or ensuring the disclosure to others of the nature or extent of such assistance. Although providing limited legal help does not alter the attorney’s professional responsibilities, some aspects of the representation require special attention. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 08-02

UTAH STATE BAR
ETHICS ADVISORY OPINION COMMITTEE
Opinion No. 08-02
Issued March 11, 2008
¶ 1. Issue:
Under what circumstances may an attorney who has represented a party in conjunction with a proceeding to appoint a guardian for an adult incapacitated person represent the guardian that is subsequently appointed as a result of that proceeding?

¶ 2. Conclusion: The representation of a court-appointed guardian by an attorney who has also represented one of the parties to the proceeding for the appointment of the guardian must be analyzed under Rules of Professional Conduct, Rules 1.7 and 1.9, the same way an attorney would analyze any conflict of interest between two current clients or between a current and former client. If the facts and circumstances of the case raise the specter of a direct or material adversity, or if the representation of another client creates a material limitation on the lawyer’s ability to represent the guardian effectively in light of the fiduciary, statutory and court imposed obligations on the guardian, the attorney should either avoid the joint representation or exercise great care in obtaining the informed written consent of both affected clients. If there is an on-going proceeding involving both the former client and the prospective new client (the guardian), the conflict may not be waived and the representation of the guardian must be avoided. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 06-01

June 2, 2006
Issue:
May members of the County Attorney’s Office provide pro bono legal assistance to victims of domestic violence in seeking civil protective orders?
If so, is it thereafter permissible for the County Attorney’s Office to prosecute the subsequent violation of the protective order?

Would it be permissible for the County Attorney’s Office to provide such legal assistance to victims of domestic violence as a governmental service and thereafter prosecute subsequent violations of the protective order if the civil division of the office assisted in the civil protective order and the criminal division in any subsequent prosecution?
Opinion: While statute, ordinance or employment contract may prohibit a government lawyer from representing individuals on a pro bono basis, the only ethical prohibition would arise from conflicts of interest provisions. Conflicts of interest rules would not prohibit the initial private representation but would prohibit the individual government lawyer from thereafter having any involvement in the prosecution of the abuser. It is conceivable that the pro bono work of one government lawyer in a large office with different divisions would have no impact upon another government lawyer in a different division handling a related matter for the government. However, it would be improper for the second lawyer to undertake to represent the governmental entity if the pro bono work undertaken by the first lawyer could create a material limitation for that second lawyer. Finally, two separate divisions of a governmental office can be established to undertake potentially conflicting work, provided that attorneys in one unit do not in any way “participate” in the work of the other unit (best achieved through “screening”) and provided that any representation of an individual or non-governmental entity fully complies with Rule 1.8(f). (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 06-05

Issued December 30, 2006
1 Issue:
Do the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct1 preclude a lawyer from participating in an ad hoc legal advisory group to a private, nonprofit, public interest legal organization, if the persons served by the legal services organization have interests adverse to the interests of a client of the lawyer or the lawyer’s law firm?

2 Conclusion: Generally, no. Rule 6.3, with respect to legal services organizations, and Rule 6.4, with respect to organizations involved in the reform of law or its administration, provide that service as an officer or director of such organizations or membership in such organizations does not by itself create an attorney-client relationship with the organization or the organization’s clients. These rules do require that a lawyer be observant of the lawyer’s duties under Rule 1.7 to the lawyer’s clients and to the clients of the lawyer’s firm. Rule 6.3 requires that the lawyer not knowingly participate in a decision of the organization that are incompatible with the lawyer’s obligations under Rule 1.7 or that could have a material adverse effect on the representation of a client of the organization whose interests are adverse to a client of the lawyer or on the representation of a client of the lawyer or the lawyer’s firm. Rule 6.4 requires that when the lawyer knows a client of the lawyer may be materially benefited by a decision of the law reform organization, that the lawyer-member disclose this fact to the organization. Under some circumstances, a lawyer’s participation on an ad hoc litigation advisory group may create an attorney-client relationship with the organization or the organization’s clients requiring the lawyer to comply with Rules 1.6, 1.7 and 1.9 before representing or continuing to represent clients adverse to the interests of the organization or the organization’s clients in such matters. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 05-01

April 28, 2005
1 Issue:
A former client of an attorney moved the trial court to set aside the former client’s previous guilty plea on the basis that the attorney’s prior advice on accepting the prosecution’s plea offer had “confused” him. May the attorney testify concerning the previous discussions with the former client to prevent a possible fraud upon the court or to protect the attorney’s good name and reputation?

2 Opinion: Absent a court order requiring the attorney’s testimony, and notwithstanding a subpoena served on the attorney by the prosecution, the attorney may not divulge any attorney-client information, either to the prosecution or in open court. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 05-04

Issued September 8, 2005
1 Issue:
What are the responsibilities of an attorney to a person the attorney has interviewed as a prospective client after it has been determined that the attorney will not undertake the representation?

2 Opinion: In most circumstances, the obligation of confidentiality attaches when a prospective client consults with the attorney in contemplation of retaining the attorney, even if that attorney is not ultimately retained and never advises the client. The provisions of Rules 1.6 and 1.9 regarding former clients outline the attorney’s responsibilities and the circumstances when such an attorney may breach confidentiality.1 Absent consent, the attorney may not undertake representation of another party in the same or substantially factually related matter if the attorney acquired relevant confidential information from the prospective client. An attorney may avoid disqualification by strictly limiting the information acquired during the initial consultation or by explicit agreement and waiver prior to the initial consultation. Under the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct in effect on the date of issuance of this Opinion, if the attorney is disqualified, the entire firm of that attorney is also disqualified. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 02-06

Issued June 12, 2002
¶ 1 Issue:
May an attorney represent a client in a criminal matter where the attorney will have to cross-examine as an adverse witness a former client whom the attorney previously represented in an unrelated matter?

¶ 2 Opinion: In general, an attorney may represent a client in a criminal case where the attorney will have to cross-examine a former client whose interests are adverse to the defendant as long as the representations of the present and former clients are not substantially factually related and the attorney does not disclose or use any confidential information gained in the course of the former client’s representation to his disadvantage, as provided by Rule 1.9. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 02-06

Issued June 12, 2002
¶ 1 Issue:
May an attorney represent a client in a criminal matter where the attorney will have to cross-examine as an adverse witness a former client whom the attorney previously represented in an unrelated matter?

¶ 2 Opinion: In general, an attorney may represent a client in a criminal case where the attorney will have to cross-examine a former client whose interests are adverse to the defendant as long as the representations of the present and former clients are not substantially factually related and the attorney does not disclose or use any confidential information gained in the course of the former client’s representation to his disadvantage, as provided by Rule 1.9. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 97-08

(Approved July 2, 1997)
Issue:
May an attorney, formerly employed by a government agency, represent a private client in challenging: (i) the validity or enforceability of statutes, rules, ordinances or procedures that the attorney participated in drafting; or (ii) specific contracts or easements that the attorney negotiated, drafted or reviewed for approval on behalf of the government agency?

Opinion: (i) As a general rule, a former government agency is not prohibited from representing a private client in matters that involve the interpretation or application of laws, rules or ordinances directly pertaining to the attorney’s employment with a government agency. (ii) The attorney may not, however, represent such a client where the representation involves the same lawsuit, the same issue of fact involving the same parties and the same situation, or conduct on which the attorney participated personally and substantially on behalf of the government agency. In any event, an attorney may not undertake representation adverse to any former client where the matter is substantially factually related to the matter for which the former client retained the attorney’s services. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 96-12

(Approved January 24, 1997)
Issue:
Is it ethical for an attorney to charge for legal advice given to callers using a “1-900 number” that would automatically bill the caller on a per-minute basis?

Opinion: It is not unethical for an attorney to give legal advice over the telephone and charge for such advice by the use of a 1-900 number.
Facts: An attorney proposes to obtain and advertise a telephone number that is accessed by first dialing 1-900 (a “1-900 number”) and to give general legal advice to callers. Advertisements promoting the 1-900 legal-advice line would state that use of the number is a toll call. Upon dialing the number, the caller would hear an introductory taped message describing the terms of the relationship to provide only general legal information, and indicating the cost of the call and legal advice. Callers would be able to terminate the call after the introductory message and not incur any charges. Legal advice would be given only by licensed members of the Utah State Bar. All callers would also be advised that no attorney/client relationship would be created, even upon receiving legal advice and incurring charges. (more…)

95-02A – May a law partner of a part-time justice court judge represent criminal defendants in the judicial district in which the justice of the peace sits?

(Approved January 26,1996)
Issue:
May a law partner of a part-time justice court judge represent criminal defendants in the judicial district in which the justice of the peace sits?

Facts: A and B are partners or associates of law firm X. A sits as a justice court judge on a part-time basis in the town of T. B’s practice involves representation of criminal defendants in the town of W (and perhaps several others) but not in the town of T. T and W are in the same Utah judicial district.
Analysis: First, it should be clear that B cannot appear before A. This would constitute “conduct that is prejudicial to the administration of justice”3and would surely result in A’s violation of the Code of Judicial Conduct.4 (more…)