Ethics Advisory Opinion 14-05

Utah State Bar
Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee
Opinion Number 14-05
Issued December 22, 2014

ISSUE

  1. When an Attorney (A) is representing another Lawyer (L) in a legal malpractice or disciplinary action, and Lawyer L undertakes to represent a client in a matter adverse to a client of Attorney A, what are the ethical considerations?

OPINION

2.         Attorney A representing a Lawyer L in a disciplinary or legal malpractice matter may face a concurrent conflict of interest if the Lawyer L (client) represents an individual who is an opposing party to a client represented by Attorney A.  A concurrent conflict of interest would arise if there is a significant risk that Attorney A’s representation of Lawyer L be will materially limited by her responsibilities to the client being sued by Lawyer L’s client; or if there is a significant risk that Attorney A’s representation of a client against Lawyer L’s client will be materially limited by her representation of Lawyer L.  Whether this situation poses a serious risk of materially limiting Attorney A’s representation requires analyzing the factual situations presented.
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Ethics Advisory Opinion 14-03

Utah State Bar
Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee

Opinion Number 14-03

Issued April 22, 2014

ISSUE

1.         Do the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct prohibit referral agreements between two attorneys that require one of the attorneys (the “Referring Attorney”) to refer to the other (the “Receiving Attorney”) all clients that have a certain specified type of products liability claim?

 OPINION

2.         The Committee concludes that an agreement between two attorneys which requires the Referring Attorney to refer to the Receiving Attorney all clients that have a certain specified type of claim may likely violate various provisions of the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct (the “Rules”).

FACTS

3.         The Referring Attorney, licensed to practice in the State of Utah, and the Receiving Attorney, licensed to practice elsewhere, enter into an agreement governed by Utah law (the “Agreement”) to jointly pursue certain kinds of products liability claims (the “Claims”) of individuals located in the State of Utah.  The Agreement provides in relevant part:
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Ethics Advisory Opinion 13-05

Utah State Bar

 Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee

Opinion Number 13-05

 Issued September 10, 2013

 ISSUE

 

1.         To what extent may an attorney participate in an “on-site” fee/retainer funding program to obtain and finance attorney retainer or litigation funds?

 OPINION

 

2.         A lawyer may not participate in an “on-site” fee/retainer funding program, under the circumstances set forth herein, as such would violate the provisions of Rules of Professional Conduct 1.7(a) (Conflict of Interest: Current Clients), Rule 1.8(a) (Acquire a pecuniary interest adverse to the client).  The lawyer may, however, obtain a waiver of the conflict by complying with the terms of Rules 1.7(b) and 1.8(a), including making full disclosure and obtaining “informed consent” confirmed in writing.  Adequate measures must also be taken to safeguard the lawyer’s independent judgment under Rule 5.4(c) (A third party may not direct or regulate the lawyer’s professional judgment.)
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Ethics Advisory Opinion 13-04

Utah State Bar

Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee

Opinion Number 13-04

Issued September 30, 2013

ISSUE

 1.        The question before the Committee concerns federal criminal law practice in the District of Utah.  Although it may have general application, this Opinion is confined to that arena.   The question is whether it is ethical under the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct for a criminal defense attorney (hereafter “the attorney”) to advise a client/defendant (hereafter “the client”) to negotiate and enter into a plea agreement whereby the client, as an integral part of his plea of guilty, waives all post-conviction claims the client may have, including claims of ineffective assistance of the attorney, except for claims of ineffective assistance of counsel based upon negotiating or entering in to the plea or waiver.
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ETHICS ADVISORY OPINION No. 08-01

OPINION NO. 08-01
MAIN OPINION:
For Dissent Opinion click here>>>
Issued April 8, 2008
1. Issue:
May an attorney provide legal assistance to litigants appearing before a tribunal pro se and prepare written submissions for them without disclosing the nature or extent of such assistance? If so, what are the attorney’s obligations when full representation is not undertaken?

2. Opinion: Under the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct, and in the absence of an express court rule to the contrary, a lawyer may provide legal assistance to litigants appearing before tribunals pro se and help them prepare written submissions without disclosing or ensuring the disclosure to others of the nature or extent of such assistance. Although providing limited legal help does not alter the attorney’s professional responsibilities, some aspects of the representation require special attention. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 08-02

UTAH STATE BAR
ETHICS ADVISORY OPINION COMMITTEE
Opinion No. 08-02
Issued March 11, 2008
¶ 1. Issue:
Under what circumstances may an attorney who has represented a party in conjunction with a proceeding to appoint a guardian for an adult incapacitated person represent the guardian that is subsequently appointed as a result of that proceeding?

¶ 2. Conclusion: The representation of a court-appointed guardian by an attorney who has also represented one of the parties to the proceeding for the appointment of the guardian must be analyzed under Rules of Professional Conduct, Rules 1.7 and 1.9, the same way an attorney would analyze any conflict of interest between two current clients or between a current and former client. If the facts and circumstances of the case raise the specter of a direct or material adversity, or if the representation of another client creates a material limitation on the lawyer’s ability to represent the guardian effectively in light of the fiduciary, statutory and court imposed obligations on the guardian, the attorney should either avoid the joint representation or exercise great care in obtaining the informed written consent of both affected clients. If there is an on-going proceeding involving both the former client and the prospective new client (the guardian), the conflict may not be waived and the representation of the guardian must be avoided. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 06-01

June 2, 2006
Issue:
May members of the County Attorney’s Office provide pro bono legal assistance to victims of domestic violence in seeking civil protective orders?
If so, is it thereafter permissible for the County Attorney’s Office to prosecute the subsequent violation of the protective order?

Would it be permissible for the County Attorney’s Office to provide such legal assistance to victims of domestic violence as a governmental service and thereafter prosecute subsequent violations of the protective order if the civil division of the office assisted in the civil protective order and the criminal division in any subsequent prosecution?
Opinion: While statute, ordinance or employment contract may prohibit a government lawyer from representing individuals on a pro bono basis, the only ethical prohibition would arise from conflicts of interest provisions. Conflicts of interest rules would not prohibit the initial private representation but would prohibit the individual government lawyer from thereafter having any involvement in the prosecution of the abuser. It is conceivable that the pro bono work of one government lawyer in a large office with different divisions would have no impact upon another government lawyer in a different division handling a related matter for the government. However, it would be improper for the second lawyer to undertake to represent the governmental entity if the pro bono work undertaken by the first lawyer could create a material limitation for that second lawyer. Finally, two separate divisions of a governmental office can be established to undertake potentially conflicting work, provided that attorneys in one unit do not in any way “participate” in the work of the other unit (best achieved through “screening”) and provided that any representation of an individual or non-governmental entity fully complies with Rule 1.8(f). (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 06-03

Issued December 8, 2006
1. Issue:
Under what circumstances may a Utah lawyer be personally involved in a lending transaction to finance a client’s cause of action or obtain funds for the payment of the lawyer’s legal fees and expenses?

2. Conclusion: (a) A lawyer may not directly or indirectly represent a lender to the lawyer’s client in connection with a loan that is made for the purpose of enabling the client to pay the lawyer’s fees or costs. (b) A lawyer may not participate in a contingent, non-recourse loan with a third-party lender to finance the costs and expenses of litigation where the terms of the lending arrangement create the potential that the financial risk to the lawyer of the lending arrangement are lessened if the lawyer obtains no recovery for the client. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 06-05

Issued December 30, 2006
1 Issue:
Do the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct1 preclude a lawyer from participating in an ad hoc legal advisory group to a private, nonprofit, public interest legal organization, if the persons served by the legal services organization have interests adverse to the interests of a client of the lawyer or the lawyer’s law firm?

2 Conclusion: Generally, no. Rule 6.3, with respect to legal services organizations, and Rule 6.4, with respect to organizations involved in the reform of law or its administration, provide that service as an officer or director of such organizations or membership in such organizations does not by itself create an attorney-client relationship with the organization or the organization’s clients. These rules do require that a lawyer be observant of the lawyer’s duties under Rule 1.7 to the lawyer’s clients and to the clients of the lawyer’s firm. Rule 6.3 requires that the lawyer not knowingly participate in a decision of the organization that are incompatible with the lawyer’s obligations under Rule 1.7 or that could have a material adverse effect on the representation of a client of the organization whose interests are adverse to a client of the lawyer or on the representation of a client of the lawyer or the lawyer’s firm. Rule 6.4 requires that when the lawyer knows a client of the lawyer may be materially benefited by a decision of the law reform organization, that the lawyer-member disclose this fact to the organization. Under some circumstances, a lawyer’s participation on an ad hoc litigation advisory group may create an attorney-client relationship with the organization or the organization’s clients requiring the lawyer to comply with Rules 1.6, 1.7 and 1.9 before representing or continuing to represent clients adverse to the interests of the organization or the organization’s clients in such matters. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 05-03

September 30, 2005
HISTORY:
On May 6, 2005, the Utah Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee issued Utah Ethics Advisory Op. No. 05-03, 2005 WL 4748681 (Utah St. Bar). The Requestors of the Opinion filed a Petition for Review with the Board of Bar Commissioners pursuant § III(e)(1) of the Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee Rules of Procedure and § VI(a)(1) of the Utah State Bar Rules Governing the Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee. At a meeting of the Board of Bar Commissioners of the Utah State Bar on July 13, 2005, the Commission reviewed the conclusions and analysis of the majority view and the minority view of Opinion No. 05-03, and voted to issue a revised opinion, set forth below as Opinion No. 05-03. The initial Opinion No. 05-03 as originally issued by the Committee is appended in its entirety for historical reference only and should not be cited or used for purposes other than background. (more…)

04-02 – May a plaintiff’s lawyer continue to represent the plaintiff in a legal malpractice action when opposing counsel has announced an intention to call plaintiff’s lawyer as a witness?

April 19, 2004
¶1 ISSUE:
May a plaintiff’s lawyer continue to represent the plaintiff in a legal malpractice action when opposing counsel has announced an intention to call plaintiff’s lawyer as a witness?

¶2 OPINION: There is no per se disqualification of a lawyer in a case where she may be called as a witness. The lawyer must determine whether, under the facts of the case, she is a “necessary witness” in the litigation under Rule 3.7. If she is, and if disqualification of the lawyer would not work a substantial hardship on the client, she must withdraw prior to trial. If the lawyer does not withdraw, the lawyer must insure that the client’s interests are and can be protected in a timely manner. This could include the filing of a motion in limine or other pleading to resolve the issue prior to trial. Concurrently, the lawyer must determine if there is a conflict of interest under Rule 1.7. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 04-01a

December 2, 2004
Amendment of Opinion No. 04-01: On March 29, 2004, the Utah Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee issued Utah Ethics Advisory Op. No. 04-01, 2004 WL 870583 (Utah St. Bar).1 The Office of Professional Conduct of the Utah State Bar filed a petition for review with the Board of Bar Commissioners pursuant to § III(e)(1) of the Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee Rules of Procedure and § VI(a)(1) of the Utah State Bar Rules Governing the Ethics Advisory Opinion Committee. The Commission asked the Committee to reconsider Opinion No. 04-01. Having reviewed the issues raised by the Office of Professional Conduct, we issue this amended opinion, which revises the conclusion and analysis of Opinion No. 04-01. Accordingly, this amended opinion replaces and supersedes Opinion No. 04-01. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 04-05

December 2, 2004
Issue:
Do the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct preclude a lawyer from forming a cooperative organization that offers certain non-legal, but law-related, services such as trust administration and investment management; referring clients to that organization; and participating in the organization’s profit sharing?

Opinion: It is not per se unethical for a lawyer to refer a client to a cooperative organization created by the lawyer to provide non-legal services and for the lawyer to participate in the organization’s profit sharing. If the lawyer complies with the following, then the arrangement is permissible: (1) objectively concludes that any identifiable conflicts between the lawyer and the cooperative organization would not materially affect the representation of that client; (2) affirms in writing to the client that the referral will not compromise the client’s interests in any way; (3) fairly concludes that the services provided by the cooperative organization are being provided at fair and reasonable fees; (4) discloses that the lawyer will receive a share of profits from the cooperative organization; (5) advises the client to seek independent counsel as to the referral; and (6) secures the client’s consent. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 04-06

December 2, 2004
Issue:
Under what circumstances is it permissible for corporate counsel to assert that counsel concurrently represents present and former corporate employees whose testimony is relevant to a claim and ethically preclude opposing counsel’s access to those corporate employee witnesses?

Opinion: If corporate counsel has actually formed an attorney-client relationship with these employee-witnesses, and has fully complied with Utah Rules of Professional Conduct 1.7 (including obtaining informed consent from all multiple clients to joint representation and informing them of the possible need for withdrawal from representing any of them should an actual conflict arise), this is permissible and opposing counsel may not interview them. However, in the absence of such a fully formed and proper attorney-client relationship, it is improper for corporate counsel to block opposing counsel’s access to other current corporate constituents, by asserting an attorney-client relationship unless these individuals were control group members, their acts could be imputed to the organization or their statement would bind the corporation with respect to the matter under Utah Rules of Professional Conduct 4.2. Similarly, it is improper to block opposing counsel’s access to any former employee in the absence of a current fully formed and proper attorney-client relationship. (more…)

Ethics Advisory Opinion No. 02-08

Issued September 18, 2002
¶ 1 Issue
: An attorney filed a complaint with the Judicial Conduct Commission against a judge. The complaint was eventually dismissed for insufficient evidence with no finding of misconduct. May the attorney accept new cases as counsel and appear before that judge without advising the clients of the complaint and without giving them the option of the attorney filing a motion for recusal?

¶ 2 Conclusion: The attorney must inform the client if the attorney thinks the judge may harbor some ill feelings toward the attorney. However, if the attorney has a reasonable good-faith belief that the judge does not harbor any ill feeling toward the lawyer, then the lawyer need not advise the client of the complaint the lawyer filed against the judge. (more…)